Ismail Hasnol Hady

After graduating from the National University of Malaysia in 2003, Hasnol worked temporarily as a field geologist in geotechnical engineering and hydrogeological consulting companies before joining PETRONAS Research and Scientific Services (PRSS) in 2005, where initially involved in routine and special core analysis in the Analytical Technology Group. Then, he joined the Deepwater Reservoir Research project in 2007, where he conducted deepwater outcrop analogue research and regional seismic interpretation of the West African margin. He was also involved in the 'Reservoir geometry, heterogeneity and characterization of West Baram Delta’ project, performing outcrop analogue study, sedimentological core descriptions, regional well log correlations, and regional seismic interpretations. In 2014-2015, he led a project entitled "Advanced fluvial facies characterization for static model improvement" focusing on core description, reservoir quality, facies analyses and mappings, and reservoir modeling. In 2015-2017, he led a project entitled "Integrated Geological Interpretation of Seismic Volume Attributes for Lateral Facies Distribution Identification". From 2017-2022, he led projects entitled "Reservoir Characterization of Unconsolidated Reservoir" and "Rapid Reservoir Modelling". 2023 until now, he is part of the team in the Gold and Orange Hidrogen projects to explore natural hydrogen in Malaysia.

25 novembre 2024 - 14h00 - 15h30
What is happening in Asia? - The evaluation of natural hydrogen potential through mineralogical studies of the sabah's ophiolite
Objectives The serpentinization of the mafic and ultramafic rocks is one of the most significant mechanisms for producing natural hydrogen in the subsurface. The northern part of Borneo is notable for its complex regional geology, particularly regarding Fe-rich rocks in the ophiolite zone of Sabah. This article discusses the mineralogy of ophiolites in Sabah, which could lead to the natural hydrogen feasibility via serpentinization processes. Methods Fieldwork was conducted in selected outcrops to investigate the presence of ophiolites, and standard petrography and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were performed on the mineral composition and composition of the rocks. The investigation area includes the ophiolites found in Ranau, Telupid and Lahad Datu, these ophiolites are composed of crystalline basement and ultramafic- serpentinite rocks that are of Triassic to Early Tertiary age. Results, Observations, Conclusions The rock samples consist mainly of serpentinite with some basalt, dolerite and amphibolite. These rocks are unconformably overlain by younger sedimentary rocks, including the Eocene-Oligocene Crocker Formation and the Paleocene-Eocene Trusmadi Formation in northern Sabah. In central Sabah, the ophiolite is overlain by the Eocene-Oligocene Crocker Formation and the Kulapis Formation, while the ophiolite in southern Sabah is overlain by the Oligocene-Middle Miocene mélange sequence such as the Kuamut, Ayer and Kalumpang Formations. The results of the geochemical and mineralogical investigations show that the serpentinite samples contain a considerable amount of serpentine minerals (Figure 1) such as antigorite, cronstedtite and lizardite as well as some unaltered ultramafic/mafic minerals (e.g. forsterite, fayalite, pyroxene and hornblende) and traces of secondary minerals (such as magnetite, chromite, hematite, siderite and pyrite). The degree of serpentinization in the serpentinite samples ranges from 25% to 79% by volume, with most samples exceeding 45%. The degree of serpentinization gradually increases from North Sabah (average 45%) to Central Sabah (average 59%) and South Sabah (average 74%). Other rock types such as basalt, dolerite and amphibolite show a lower degree of serpentinization, ranging from 2% to 20%. The laboratory analyses indicate that significant serpentinization processes have occurred along the ophiolite zone of Sabah, which could yield significant amounts of hydrogen gas through the geochemical reactions below: 1.     3Fe2SiO4 (fayalite) + 2H2O → 2Fe3O4 (magnetite) + 3SiO2 (quartz) + 2H2 6Fe2SiO4 (fayalite) + 7H2O → 3Fe3Si2O5(OH)4 (serpentine) + Fe3O4 (magnetite) + H2 The overlying sedimentary rock formations could provide reservoir and seal traps for the hydrogen gas accumulation. These results give new insight into potential natural hydrogen resources in Sabah’s ophiolite zone; however, more detailed investigations are needed for further evaluation. Limited subsurface data is a major challenge in studying the entire natural subsurface hydrogen system along the ophiolite zone in Sabah. Novel/Additive Information The study provides fresh insights and new information about the potential of natural hydrogen in the Sabah’s ophiolite zone, Malaysia.
90 MIN

Objectives

The serpentinization of the mafic and ultramafic rocks is one of the most significant mechanisms for producing natural hydrogen in the subsurface. The northern part of Borneo is notable for its complex regional geology, particularly regarding Fe-rich rocks in the ophiolite zone of Sabah. This article discusses the mineralogy of ophiolites in Sabah, which could lead to the natural hydrogen feasibility via serpentinization processes.

Methods

Fieldwork was conducted in selected outcrops to investigate the presence of ophiolites, and standard petrography and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were performed on the mineral composition and composition of the rocks. The investigation area includes the ophiolites found in Ranau, Telupid and Lahad Datu, these ophiolites are composed of crystalline basement and ultramafic- serpentinite rocks that are of Triassic to Early Tertiary age.

Results, Observations, Conclusions

The rock samples consist mainly of serpentinite with some basalt, dolerite and amphibolite. These rocks are unconformably overlain by younger sedimentary rocks, including the Eocene-Oligocene Crocker Formation and the Paleocene-Eocene Trusmadi Formation in northern Sabah. In central Sabah, the ophiolite is overlain by the Eocene-Oligocene Crocker Formation and the Kulapis Formation, while the ophiolite in southern Sabah is overlain by the Oligocene-Middle Miocene mélange sequence such as the Kuamut, Ayer and Kalumpang Formations. The results of the geochemical and mineralogical investigations show that the serpentinite samples contain a considerable amount of serpentine minerals (Figure 1) such as antigorite, cronstedtite and lizardite as well as some unaltered ultramafic/mafic minerals (e.g. forsterite, fayalite, pyroxene and hornblende) and traces of secondary minerals (such as magnetite, chromite, hematite, siderite and pyrite). The degree of serpentinization in the serpentinite samples ranges from 25% to 79% by volume, with most samples exceeding 45%. The degree of serpentinization gradually increases from North Sabah (average 45%) to Central Sabah (average 59%) and South Sabah (average 74%). Other rock types such as basalt, dolerite and amphibolite show a lower degree of serpentinization, ranging from 2% to 20%. The laboratory analyses indicate that significant serpentinization processes have occurred along the ophiolite zone of Sabah, which could yield significant amounts of hydrogen gas through the geochemical reactions below:

1.     3Fe2SiO4 (fayalite) + 2H2O → 2Fe3O4 (magnetite) + 3SiO2 (quartz) + 2H2

  1. 6Fe2SiO4 (fayalite) + 7H2O → 3Fe3Si2O5(OH)4 (serpentine) + Fe3O4 (magnetite) + H2

The overlying sedimentary rock formations could provide reservoir and seal traps for the hydrogen gas accumulation. These results give new insight into potential natural hydrogen resources in Sabah’s ophiolite zone; however, more detailed investigations are needed for further evaluation. Limited subsurface data is a major challenge in studying the entire natural subsurface hydrogen system along the ophiolite zone in Sabah.